In every class I offer an assignment to teach the foundations of process and technique whether it be within oil painting, drawing, or color theory, allowing the students to find their own ways of experimenting––an open approach that lets them wander, develop their own methods of exploration, and define their own methods of intent in art-making.”

Brenda Moore is a Chicago based visual artist represented by Linda Warren Projects, and her third solo exhibition will take place at LWP in December of 2016.  She has taught at The Academy since 2003.

She has also exhibited in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New Hampshire, Indiana, and Kentucky.  Moore received a Master of Fine Arts from American University, Washington, D.C. and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Her work is included in both corporate and private collections in the United States such as Wellington Management in Boston, and Deloite & Touche, Kirkland and Ellis, and in the private collection of Lewis Manilow in Chicago. In 2014, Moore received an Individual Artist Project grant from the city of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events to work with Anchor Graphics on a lithography project in Chicago. She has lectured at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois and at University of St. Francis in Fort Wayne, Indiana (as part of a solo exhibition).  

Moore is a narrative/figurative artist for whom horses are the focal point.  She creates work in encaustic, oil painting, printmaking, embroidery, installation, video, and sculpture. She has taught at The Academy since 2003. She has a cross-disciplinary approach to art-making and enjoys teaching at The Academy on account of all of the like-minded artists on faculty and the disciplined approach to the investigatory process of defining the individual student. Moore explains that, "In every class I offer an assignment to teach the foundations of process and technique whether it be within oil painting, drawing, or color theory, allowing the students to find their own ways ofexperimenting––an open approach that lets them wander, develop their own methods of exploration, and define their own methods of intent in art-making. I teach to each individual artist.  This allows for an uninhibited and collectively healthy environment in which all students receive individualized attention and in which they each have a voice to lend to the group dynamic while maintaining authenticity in their own personal visions."